Google invents smart contact lens with built-in camera: Superhuman Terminator-like vision here we come

Google invents smart contact lens with built-in camera: Superhuman Terminator-like vision here we come

Google has invented a new smart contact lens with an integrated camera. The camera would be very small and sit near the edge of the contact lens so that it doesn’t obscure your vision. By virtue of being part of the contact lens, the camera would naturally follow your gaze, allowing for a huge range of awesome applications, from the basis of a bionic eye system for blind and visually impaired people, through to early warning systems (the camera spots a hazard before your brain does), facial recognition, and superhuman powers (telescopic and infrared/night vision). In related news, Google Glass is publicly available today in the US for one day only (still priced at $1500).

This new smart contact lens would have a tiny CMOS camera sensor just below your pupil, control circuit, and some method of receiving power wirelessly (more on that later). Because an imaging sensor, by definition, has to absorb light, it wouldn’t be transparent — but it could probably be color matched to your iris, so that your eyes don’t look too freaky.

1

A diagram of Google’s smart contact lens with integrated camera [Image credit: Patent Bolt]

As you can probably imagine, there are some rather amazing applications if you have two cameras embedded in your contact lenses. You can’t do much in the way of image processing on the contact lens itself, but you could stream it to a nearby smartphone or head-mounted display (i.e. Google Glass), where a more powerful computer could perform all sorts of real-time magic. Google suggests that the cameras might warn you if there’s oncoming traffic at a crosswalk — useful for a normal-sighted person, but utterly invaluable for a blind or partially sighted person. For me, the more exciting possibilities include facial recognition (a la Terminator), and abilities that verge on the super or transhuman, such as being able to digitally zoom in and infrared thermal night vision. (Read: What is transhumanism, or, what does it mean to be human?)Terminator-enhanced-vision-display-still

Beyond the medical- and consumer-oriented applications, you can also imagine the possibilities if police were equipped with contact lenses that could spot criminal faces in a crowd, or a bulge under a jacket that could be a concealed weapon. Oh, and the most exciting/deadly application of them all: Soldiers with smart contact lenses that alert them to incoming fire, provide infrared vision that can see through smoke, real-time range finding for more accurate sniping…

Single pixel contact lens display, in a rabbit's eye

A contact lens display in a rabbit’s eye (way back in 2011)

This invention, from the Google X skunkworks lab, comes in the form of a patent that was filed in 2012 and was recently published by the US PTO. Earlier this year, Google announced that it was working on a smart contact lens for diabetics that provides a real-time glucose level reading from your tears. As far as we can tell, there’s no timeline for real-world trials of either variety of contact lens — but we can tell you that the technology to create such devices is very nearly here. Way back in 2011, a smart contact lens with an LED display was trialed in the lab.

Moving forward, there are some concerns about power delivery (there’s no space for a battery, of course, so it has to be beamed in wirelessly), and whether it’s wise to have a wireless device implanted in a rather sensitive organ, but I don’t think these will be game-breaking problems. For now, we’re talking about fairly chunky contact lenses that are best suited to laboratory testing — but it shouldn’t be more than a few years until real, comfortable smart contact lenses come to market.

Slow Life: Hypnotizing Macro Timelapse Of Exotic Corals Made With 150,000 Photos

Slow Life Hypnotizing Macro Timelapse Of Exotic Corals Made With 150,000 Photos

For anyone who’s seen the coral that inhabits the many astounding ocean reefs around the world, it’s hard to deny that this form of marine life can be quite beautiful.

Whether you’re snorkeling above it, peering into its salt-water home from land, or simply having viewed it through pictures or videos, the effect it has on the scenery of underwater landscapes is remarkable.

However, regardless of how exquisite any type of coral may look, most people tend to be more interested in other, more animated and seemingly exciting types of ocean dwellers. Admit it – it’s likely that you’d get more excited about seeing a dolphin, sea-turtle, or large brightly-colored fish next to you in the water instead of what can sometimes just look like a stagnant, oddly shaped plant or rock.

However, in this fantastic time-lapsed video, you can really see how amazing coral life is.

Daniel Stoupin, a PHD student from the University of Queensland in Australia, put together his magnificent “Slow Life” video made up of thousands of high-quality, close up photos of coral.

However, in this fantastic time-lapsed video, you can really see how amazing coral life is.

The time lapse displays coral movement at speeds you’ve never seen before, truly demonstrating how amazing the marine life is. Set to very fitting, mysterious, and almost hypnotic sounding music, the video contains numerous incredible displays of coral movement.

The marine life seems to bloom before your eyes, moving, and shifting in amazing and unbelievable ways. The many types of coral grow and change, even displaying a wide range of beautiful colors, from pale pinks and vibrant greens to deep blues and purples. It’s an astounding sight that you have to see to believe!

But this video wasn’t made simply to entertain viewers with pretty displays of underwater life – it has a much deeper purpose. Not only does it bring attention to the beauty and excitement of coral that’s often taken for granted, but it also helps people become more aware of how crucial coral is to the entire ocean.

6

Stoupin goes into detail and gives fantastic explanations about coral, its contribution to the ocean, and the reasoning behind the video on his blb

 

Stoupin partially attributes the threat to coral reefs to the fact that humans are programmed to receive fast moving life much better than slow moving types. Forms of life that operate and change much more quickly than coral tends to resonate with us easier, and, as Stoupin explains, for us, sometimes life like coral is “literally indistinguishable from rock”.

 

But clearly, as you can see in this video, coral is well and alive, and moves just as much as anything else, albeit at a much slower speed. But you can’t deny that the marine life is an outstanding living spectacle that contributes greatly to the ocean and coral reefs throughout the entire planet.

 

Stoupin really makes a sincere point with his stunning array of time lapsed photographs that are both beautiful and for a positive cause. Go ahead and just try to take a look at this video, watching the coral move and grow magnificently before your eyes, and tell me it’s not outstanding – it’s impossible to see it as anything short of amazing.

8

 

og, if you’re interested in learning more. Known as “slow” marine life, given that it doesn’t move nearly as quickly as other types of life, coral displays many of the same types of actions as us humans.

While we may never notice, coral does things like grow, reproduce, and move from one spot to another, often away from unfavorable conditions. Their actions directly benefit the ocean, such as through their cycling of nutrients that makes coral reef existence possible.  Yet, unfortunately, coral reefs are also threatened, and Stoupin’s video makes an important attempt to draw people’s awareness to the importance of this marine life

 

Indian man says he is 179 years old

indiani

A man from the northern section of India claims that he was born in January of 1835 and today he is 179 years old. The man is a retired Cobbler named Mahashta Murasi. If he is telling the truth, he is the oldest man on Earth and the oldest human being to have ever lived per the Guinness Book of World Records.

The man claims that he was born in Bangalore on January 6, 1835. He says that he has lived in Varanasi since 1903. He claims to have been alive for so many years that even his great grandchildren have been dead for many years. Maybe he is immortal? Can you imagine getting old, decrepid, weak and wrinkly and not be able to ever die? What’s the point in living if you can’t enjoy life?

 

This Mom Had an Amazing Idea. $12 and 30 Minutes Later, The Kids Are LOVING It!

This Mom Had an Amazing Idea. $12 and 30 Minutes Later, The Kids Are LOVING It!

The weather is nice outside, really nice. With the sun beaming down, a slight, therapeutic breeze, I stepped outside, and I thought to myself, “I am now in heaven.” As we’re going to be deep into spring and soon summer will be upon us, we’ll be spending more time outside, so that means more fun outdoor activities.

This one is a complete gem, though. Only costs $12 and 30 minutes. Not many dollars, not much time. How can you lose?

Leisha, mom to toddler girls, started with this: painter’s plastic.

home

The seal created is great, so nothing can leak out, which is a fatal flaw in most of the other water blobs.

Time to fill it up!

Time to fill it up!

Leopard Kіlls Baboon, Saves іt’s Baby From Hyenas

 

Nature is cruel, bizarre, crazy and beautiful all at once! An amazing piece of natural history has been caught on tape as female Leopard kills a female Baboon and saves its baby from Hyenas.
On the video above, the 2-year old leopard pounded her baboon prey and kills it. Then, suddenly, something stirs in the dead baboon’s fur and the law of the jungle is re-written.The leopard found out that the baboon has a baby and a surprising turn happened, exhibiting her maternal instinct, she protected the baby from Hyena, she also play and nurse the baby baboon. Unfortunately the baby dies at night from the cold.

Crimea has long been a strategic and geopolitical prize. Ancient Cimmerians and Greeks, followed by the Goths and Venetians, were just a few of the embattled peninsula’s many occupiers over the centuries.

The origin of its name is debated, but may have come from the word qrïm, meaning fortress, when it served as a capital of the Golden Horde in the 13th century. Long under the protection of the Ottoman Empire, the Crimean Khanate ruled the area for more than 300 years until Catherine the Great annexed the peninsula in 1783, part of a broad expansion of the Russian Empire under the Tsarina’s reign. The five maps that follow illustrate how Crimea continued to change hands from the 18th century to the present.

Crimea

A vassal state of the Ottoman Empire since 1478, Crimea evolved into several political entities after the Russo-Turkish Treaty in 1774.

A vassal state of the Ottoman Empire since 1478, Crimea evolved into several political entities after the Russo-Turkish Treaty in 1774.

As a consequence of the Russian Revolution, Crimea changed hands and officially took on several new names over this three-year period.

As a consequence of the Russian Revolution, Crimea changed hands and officially took on several new names over this three-year period.

After the reassertion of Soviet control in late 1920, Crimea became an autonomous Soviet Socialist Republic, until the territory was annexed by Nazi Germany in 1941, returning to Russian control in 1945.

After the reassertion of Soviet control in late 1920, Crimea became an autonomous Soviet Socialist Republic, until the territory was annexed by Nazi Germany in 1941, returning to Russian control in 1945.

During the late Soviet era, Crimea was transferred to Ukraine, with its administrative status being upgraded on the eve of the dissolution of the U.S.S.R.

During the late Soviet era, Crimea was transferred to Ukraine, with its administrative status being upgraded on the eve of the dissolution of the U.S.S.R.

With the breakup of the Soviet Union in 1991, Crimea became part of an independent Ukraine. Crimea’s communist authorities proclaimed self-government in 1992, which ultimately led to the territory being granted expanded autonomous rights by Kiev.

Source nationalgeographic